Inter vs Intra

Inter vs Intra

Intrastate is within the state / Interstate connects other states

State of Mind?

While working on my Book of I, I am astounded at how many words there are which begin with the letter I.

Interject is forcing something in. Another I word.

The dictionary of the English language is full of surprises. Modern English is such a mish-mash of other languages, it is almost nonsensical. I can’t imagine how difficult it is to learn this as a second language. Perhaps it is because of shear rote use by native speakers, the complexity is overlooked.

Investigate is an interesting word. (Come to think of it, so is interesting…) So many “I – words” begin with the prefix “In”. Perhaps an investigation of where this comes from would be prudent.

Word Origin and History for in-

prefix meaning “not, opposite of, without” (also im-, il-, ir- by assimilation of -n- with following consonant), from Latin in- “not,” cognate with Greek an-, Old English un-, from PIE *ne “not” (see un- (1)).

element meaning “into, in, on, upon” (also im-, il-, ir- by assimilation of -n- with following consonant), from Latin in- “in” (see in). In Old French this often became en-, which usually was respelled in English to conform with Latin, but not always, which accounts for pairs like enquire/inquire. There was a native form, which in West Saxon usually appeared as on- (cf. Old English onliehtan “to enlighten”), and some verbs survived into Middle English (cf. inwrite “to inscribe”), but all now seem to be extinct. Not related to in- (1) “not,” which also was a common prefix in Latin: to the Romans impressus could mean “pressed” or “unpressed.”
2

element meaning “into, in, on, upon” (also im-, il-, ir- by assimilation of -n- with following consonant), from Latin in- “in” (see in ). In Old French this often became en-, which usually was respelled in English to conform with Latin, but not always, which accounts for pairs like enquire/inquire. There was a native form, which in West Saxon usually appeared as on- (cf. Old English onliehtan “to enlighten”), and some verbs survived into Middle English (cf. inwrite “to inscribe”), but all now seem to be extinct. Not related to in- (1) “not,” which also was a common prefix in Latin: to the Romans impressus could mean “pressed” or “unpressed.”

in-. (n.d.). Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved July 8, 2017 from Dictionary.com website http://www.dictionary.com/browse/in-

I am inspired. (Spirit within?)

In fact, let’s look at the Four “I” words I have assigned for the four aspects of an individual (having some fun with them…)

Instinct -> in – stinked?

Intellect -> in – tell hecked?

Intuition -> in – to is Shun?

Intention -> in – tend Shawn?

Silly. I know. But I have to allow it all to flow when writing stream of conscious. Today I just decided to share a little bit of ItInsight into Stever’s Imagination (Insanity?) (Boy, those “I” words just keep flowing…)

Come to think of It, It is the “I” word which the Knights Who Say Ni must never hear. (Monty Python reference, drop mic!)

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